At any time, you may scroll to the Search bar at the top of the page and type a specific question or topic.

,

Personal Action Plan

Take some time to think about what you will do to continue to maintain or improve your brain health.

Download and print a copy of the activity sheet My Personal Action Plan below. Reflect on and answer the statements in both columns. Then circle the number between 0 and 10 that represents your confidence level.

If you rate your confidence below a 7, you might want to look at the barriers and consider reworking your action plan so that it's something you are confident that you can accomplish.

Download File

Christine Bryden was a top civil servant and single mother of three children when she was diagnosed with dementia at the age of 46. "Dancing with Dementia" is a vivid account of her experiences of living with dementia, exploring the effects of memory problems, loss of independence, difficulties in communication and the exhaustion of coping with simple tasks.

Here is an audio file from Christine's book. Take a few minutes to listen to her words as she shares from the perspective of a person living with dementia. Feel free to make some notes as you listen.

,

For Reflection...

After you listen to the recording, take a few minutes to reflect on the following questions.  Feel free to make some notes.

,

Additional Reading

Dancing with Dementia by Christine Bryden: Available from 

http://www.christinebryden.com/books/book-dancing-with-dementia/

Here we have three conversations with Chris Nelson where she shares different experiences of what it has been like living with dementia after their diagnosis and how they have worked with the changes in their lives.

,

The Experience of Living with Dementia while Dining at a Restaurant

Join Chris as she discusses how her frontotemporal dementia affects dining out at a restaurant in her community.

,

For Reflection...

After you listen to the conversations, take a few minutes to reflect on the following questions.  Feel free to make some notes.

,

The Experience of Living with Dementia while Banking

Join Chris as she discusses how her frontotemporal dementia affects doing her daily banking.

,

The Experience of Living with Dementia while Shopping at a Grocery Store

Join Chris as she discusses how her frontotemporal dementia affects a daily activity such as shopping at your local grocery store.

Let’s now explore the changing brain function in a person living with dementia. The highway system analogy used in the video below is an illustration of brain function.

Please feel free to pause the video whenever you need to consider the points shared or to note questions for further discussion.

,

First Link Connection - The Brain as a Highway System (FULL Version)

We hope the analogy of brain function as a highway system has been helpful to you. If you'd like to watch the video again from beginning to end or are doing so for the first time, please feel free to pause it whenever you need and jot down any questions that arise.

,

For Reflection

After you watch the video, take a few minutes to reflect on the following questions.  Feel free to make some notes.

,

Additional Resources

You may also hear about the connections between Alzheimer’s disease and other illnesses. Click on the links below to be taken to the Alzheimer Society of Canada National Resource Library.

 

There are many rare types of dementia that can be view on the website such as:

,

Webinar

Understanding Dementia - Tips and Tricks

,

Download these PDFs of the Video Transcript if you would like to print a copy and save as a reference.

Download File, Download File, Download File, Download File, Download File

Let's explore some of the current statistics to help create a picture of the urgency and impact of Dementia in our communities.

Dementia Statistics Quiz

Let's explore some of the current statistics to help create a picture of the urgency and impact of Dementia in our communities.

Let's explore some of the current statistics to help create a picture of the urgency and impact of Dementia in our communities.

The Alzheimer Society is committed to providing accurate and reliable data on dementia in Canada.

To discover more statistics about Dementia take some time to review the numbers here: https://alzheimer.ca/en/about-dementia/what-dementia/dementia-numbers-canada#More_useful_links_and_resources

Statistics listed on the webpage are the most current available and are updated periodically when new reports and studies are issued.

Additional Reading

Navigating the Path Forward for Dementia in Canada " September 2022

Download File

The word dementia is a general term that refers to many different diseases. Different types of dementia are caused by different physical changes to the brain. Some dementias are reversible, meaning that they can be treated and cured. Some are irreversible, meaning that there is no cure yet.

Examples of other dementias include:

You may also hear about connections between dementia and illnesses, such as:

Mental Health and Dementia

What do mental illness and dementia have in common?

Mental illnesses (like schizophrenia, depression, bipolar disease) are disorders of the brain. So is dementia.

Disorders of the brain can cause problems in one or more of its three main functions: how we move, think, and feel. In the case of dementia, “cognition”—the thinking, knowing, problem-solving, and judgement functions of our brain—is primarily affected.

Dementia and other mental illnesses share other important similarities:

People with dementia may face stigma, which involves isolation, disengagement, and susceptibility to discrimination.

Depression in Older Adults

What is depression?

Everyone feels sad sometimes. We all have bad days and times when we feel down. If you feel sad, hopeless, or bored with things you normally enjoy for weeks or months, you may be experiencing depression.

Depression is a treatable illness that can affect your feelings, body, and relationships. It can be hard to picture ever feeling good again. Depression often does not get better on its own. Without treatment, it may even last for years. If you have any of these symptoms for more than two weeks, seek help.

Download and print the handout below to learn more about the symptoms of depression, how it is diagnosed and things you can do to start feeling better.

Source: Canadian Coalition for Seniors’ Mental Health

Depression in Older Adults

More Learning Resources

Other Types of Dementia

Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias are not a part of normal aging. 

Almost 40 per cent of people over the age of 65 experience some form of memory loss. When there is no underlying medical condition causing this memory loss, it is known as "age-associated memory impairment," which is considered a part of the normal aging process.  Sometimes it is called “age related memory loss.”

But brain diseases like Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias are different.

Age-associated memory impairment and dementia can be told apart in a number of ways. In general, a memory problem may become a concern if it begins to affect your day-to-day living. Most older adults do not go on to develop Alzheimer’s disease or other dementia.  

,

Age Related Memory Loss and Dementia - Segment with Geriatrician

Host Liana Shannon speaks with geriatrician, Jasneet Parmar about Alzheimer's disease and other dementias. Dr. Parmar explains the difference between normal age-related memory loss and dementia.

,

Additional Reading

What is Alzheimer's disease?

Download File,

Dispelling the Myths

Download File,

10 Warning Signs

Download File

Alzheimer's disease is a fatal, progressive and degenerative disease that destroys brain cells. It is the most common form of dementia, accounting for 64 per cent of all dementias in Canada.

Alzheimer's disease is not a normal part of aging. Symptoms include having difficulty remembering things, making decisions and performing everyday activities. These changes can affect the way a person feels and acts. There is currently no way to stop the disease, but research is improving the way we provide care and will continue to search for a cure.

,

An introduction from the Alzheimer Society

,

What is Alzheimer's Disease

Narrated by David Hyde Pierce, the video below provides an excellent explanation of plaques and tangles and the impact on brain deterioration throughout the course of the disease.

,

Additional Reading

What is Alzheimer's disease?

Download File,

Dispelling the Myths

Download File,

10 Warning Signs

Download File

The risk of developing dementia appears to increase as a result of conditions that affect the heart or blood vessels, particularly when these occur at mid-life.

These conditions include:

Source:  5 Simple Steps to Maximize Your Brain Health, Alzheimer’s Australia.

What about smoking?

Smoking increases the risk of heart disease, stroke, cancer and other diseases.

Studies have shown that current smokers have a greater chance of developing dementia than people who don’t smoke.

There is no safe level of smoking. If you do smoke, seek medical advice on ways to help you quit.

Source:  5 Simple Steps to Maximize Your Brain Health, Alzheimer’s Australia.

,

Heads up for Healthier Brains

Read this brochure/handout to learn more about managing your risks.

Download File,

Source: Alzheimer Society of Canada

What questions do you have from the information you've received in this program?

Joint our Client Services team for either a virtual (online) discussion or attend one of our in person First Link Connection sessions. Dates are available from the Client Services Team.

Alternatively, carry on the conversation today by joining the online discussions at Dementia Talk.

Dementia Talk

If you are unable to attend one of our virtual or in person First Link Connection sessions, you can also clickhereto access the Dementia Talk. In this forum you will be connected with other members of the dementia community who will be able to share their experiences and possibly answer your questions.

Clicking on this link will take you to a new window in your internet browser. To return to the HelpForDementia you will need to return to this tab in your internet browser.