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Past Live Meetings

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Past Live Meeting
Exploring Nutrition Care: How Dietitians Can Support You on Your Journey Through Alzheimer's Disease Presented by Kristin Hruschak
Join us for an insightful webinar on the different roles nutrition can play in the Alzheimer's journey. In this session, we will explore the role of dietitians in providing compassionate care and expert guidance for individuals, as well as their devoted care partners. Discover the truth behind common nutrition myths and gain valuable insights into optimizing dietary choices to enhance overall well-being and quality of life. Learn how dietitians can be your trusted partners in enriching lives, empowering minds, and making a significant difference throughout your journey.
Dec 6, 2023
7:00 PM
60 minutes
Past Live Meeting
Sexual Expressions - Learning New Ways to Cope Presented by Natalie Wilton
Caregivers often identify that one of the most challenging aspects of being a care partner is when the person that they are caring for experiences sexual expressions. Caregivers often feel a sense of embarrassment and find themselves at a loss with how to respond. Partners and spouses frequently experience feelings of grief and confusion as they navigate unexpected situations that arise related to intimacy and sexuality. This presentation will review tips and strategies for care partners to better understand sexual expressions and learn new ways to cope with the changing relationship.
Nov 15, 2023
7:00 PM
60 minutes
Past Live Meeting
Practical Strategies for Understanding Sexual Expressions Presented by Natalie Wilton
This presentation will help clinicians who support clients and care partners with dementia who are experiencing sexually responsive behaviour. We will review tips on how to assess and better understand why sexual expressions happen and offer practical strategies that you can use to support both the care partner and persons living with dementia.
Nov 2, 2023
1:00 PM
60 minutes
Past Live Meeting
Ask Us Anything Home Care Panel Presentation!
Please join us as we welcome home care representatives from all over the province! This will be an "Ask Us Anything" style presentation. Home care can be a tricky part of our healthcare system, so bring your questions and settle in for an excellent presentation filled with helpful information!
Oct 18, 2023
7:00 PM
60 minutes
Past Live Meeting
Exploring Nutrition Care Along the Journey Through Alzheimer's Disease Presented by Kristen Hruschak
Join us for an insightful webinar as we delve into the critical role of nutrition care in navigating the journey through Alzheimer's disease. The webinar will include a brief lecture followed by a question-and-answer period. Gain valuable insights into optimizing dietary habits, addressing common challenges, and promoting overall well-being to support individuals and their loved ones on this unique path. Don't miss this opportunity to explore the power of nutrition in enhancing the quality of life throughout the journey through Alzheimer's disease. Have your nutrition questions ready!
Oct 12, 2023
1:00 PM
60 minutes
Past Live Meeting
Alberta Health Advocates and how they can work for you! Presented by Ryan Bielby
Health advocates promote education and awareness of Alberta's Health Charter, listen to Albertans about their healthcare experiences and promote health literacy. Join us to celebrate World Alzheimer's Day and to learn how they can help you navigate our healthcare systems.
Sep 21, 2023
7:00 PM
60 minutes
Explore Live and Past Events

Education

Care & Support
End-of-Life Stage

Dementia is a life-limiting illness. How and when dying will come is a personal experience for everyone.

4 Sessions to discover
Care & Support
Late Stage

It is a natural human reaction to hope when facing challenges. When living with a progressive illness, what we hope for changes over time. Hope always remains present.

5 Sessions to discover
Care & Support
Middle Stage

Dementia may be something you have lived with for a while or a shorter time. As dementia progresses, the abilities of the person living with dementia change too. They are working hard to keep up with daily life and need an increasing amount of support to make sense of the world around them. As dementia progresses, roles and responsibilities change for everyone involved. All the changes bring new emotions and grief.

5 Sessions to discover
Care & Support
Early Stage

In the early stage, subtle changes in one’s abilities are noticeable to people living with dementia and/or to the people close to them. Everyone in the circle is re-arranging roles and responsibilities, consciously or not.

4 Sessions to discover
Care & Support
Protected: Caregiver-Centered Care Initiative

Caregiver-centered care is person-centered care for family caregivers. This approach respects and meaningfully involves the care receiver’s family caregiver in the planning and delivery of supportive services. It also recognizes and addresses caregiver needs and preferences and integrates family caregivers as partners in care.

2 Sessions to discover
Care & Support
First Link Connection

First Link Connection

5 Sessions to discover
Care & Support
La trousse du proche aidant - En établissement de soins de longue durée

Il s’agit d’un document conçu pour vous aider à vous préparer, comme proche aidant, en vue des changements ou des événements éventuels, afin de pouvoir prendre soin d’un membre de votre entourage vivant avec la maladie d’Alzheimer ou une maladie apparentée. « En établissement de soins de longue durée » renvoie à tous les milieux de vie destinés à des personnes âgées en perte d’autonomie, lesquels incluent des services et des soins.

4 Sessions to discover
Care & Support
My Tools 4 Care

My Tools 4 Care was developed to help you as a care partner as you care for a person living with dementia in the community.

5 Sessions to discover
Care & Support
My Tools 4 Care - In Care

This is a toolkit to help you as a care partner prepare for possible changes or events, so you can support your family member with dementia in care. “In care” means receiving 24-hour care in a facility, for example, long-term care.

4 Sessions to discover
Care & Support
Brain Health - Education Series

Act Today to Protect Tomorrow

8 Sessions to discover
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Resources

What is the difference between Alzheimer’s disease and Dementia?

The word dementia is an umbrella term that refers to many different diseases. Different physical changes to the brain cause various types of dementia. Some dementias are reversible, meaning that they can be treated and cured, while others are irreversible, meaning that there is no cure yet.

Dementia is not a specific disease. Many diseases can cause dementia, including Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia (due to strokes), Lewy Body dementia (LBD), head trauma, frontotemporal dementia (FTD), Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), Parkinson’s disease, and Huntington’s disease. These conditions can have similar and overlapping symptoms.

Dementia is an overall term for a set of symptoms that are caused by disorders affecting the brain. Symptoms may include memory loss and difficulties with thinking, problem-solving or language, severe enough to reduce a person's ability to perform everyday activities. A person with dementia may also experience changes in mood or behaviour.

My grandmother had Alzheimer's disease. Will I develop it as well?

There are two types of Alzheimer's disease.

Familial Autosomal Dominant (FAD) Alzheimer’s disease accounts for less than 5% of all cases of Alzheimer’s disease and is linked to genetics. For FAD to occur, the disease must be evident across multiple generations of a single family.

Sporadic Alzheimer's disease is the most common form of Alzheimer's disease, and it does not have a specific family link. People with this type may or may not have a family history of the disease.

 

What are some quick facts on dementia in Canada?

Dementia Numbers in Canada

By 2030, researchers project that nearly 1 million people in Canada will be living with dementia. And they forecast that more than 1.7 million people in Canada will have dementia by 2050. 

  • As of January 1, 2024, we estimate that 733,040 people in Canada are living with dementia.
  • Every day, more than 350 people in Canada develop dementia. This is more than 15 every hour.
  • By 2030, nearly 1 million people in Canada could live with dementia.
  • This would be 187,000 new cases a year, 512 a day and 21 an hour, by 2030. Canada could have a 51% increase in the number of new dementia cases a year (Compared to 2020).
  • By 2030, the number of people in Canada living with dementia could increase 65% compared to 2020. (From 597,300 to 990,600.)
  • 20,000+ Canadians will develop dementia every month in the 2040s.
  • By 2050, more than 1.7 million people in Canada could have dementia.
  • This would mean, by 2050, 685 people will be diagnosed each day with dementia in Canada, or 29 every hour.
  • 6.3 million people in Canada will develop, live with and/or ultimately die with dementia between 2020 and 2050.
Caregiving and Dementia in Canada
  • Care partners of older adults with dementia provide 26 hours of care a week, on average. This compares to 17 hours a week for older adults with other health issues. (Source: Canadian Institute for Health Information)
  • Every year, family and friends provide more than 470 million hours of care to people living with dementia. This is equivalent to 235,000 full-time jobs.
  • Dementia care provided by family and friends in 2022 would equal more than $7.3 billion dollars in Canada alone.
  • By 2050, Canada will have more than 1 million care partners for people living with dementia. The care they provide will equal more than 1.4 billion hours per year, or 690,000 full-time jobs.
  • The number of care partners would nearly triple (188% increase) over 30 years (2020 to 2050).
  • 45% of care partners for seniors living with dementia show symptoms of distress. The distress rate for care partners of seniors with other health conditions is almost half that (26%). (Source: Canadian Institute for Health Information)

The recommendations section of The Many Faces of Dementia in Canada report contains further recommendations for Alzheimer societies, governments, healthcare systems, and researchers.

Where can I find a list of resources to help me with care planning?

Here are four separate resource links that provide you with website addresses you may want to explore. These documents refer to Care Partner checklists. Please click here (Seeds of Hope Family Learning Series—HelpForDementia) to find the checklists associated with each stage. 

Resources for Early-Stage Planning

Resources for Middle-Stage Planning

Resources for Late-Stage Planning

Resources for End-of-Life Stage Planning

 

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